Recalled to Life

It’s time Miss Fjelde. The story of your death must be retold. As it will.

And so it begins again as it must. There are those who don’t know this story… and for those of us who do, memory begins to fade. There is so much, that it will take time to bring it all back. There are parts of this story that will remain untold, because some will refuse to tell.

And so it begins again, as it must, when one day in 2008, Brian Finstad in his role as CANDO housing committee chair received a notification of a wrecking permit application and he took the initiative to look at a copy of the original building permit…and saw the name of a woman he’d never heard of…
Permit

The Home of Pauline Fjelde is Threatened by the Wrecking Ball

I’ve just begun to re-tell this story and am already wrong about the facts…
It was Connie Nompelis who was the chair of the CANDO housing committee in 2008 and it was her press release published on the e-democracy.org/mpls discussion list that informed me of the meeting. click

I still believe it was Brian who looked for the permit…and that the information about Pauline and her family, work and life came from collaborative research including research by historian Susan Hunter Weir.

I acknowledge that I am imperfect. I am neither a neutral or impartial narrator. I can only tell the part of the story I know. There is much I do not know. I can only hope that others involved will document their version of events. Whether or not their truth will be communicated or shredded at the end of the retention or put into a fireplace many years from now…time will tell…’cept he won’t tell…will he?

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One Response

  1. Yes, Connie was the chair. I don’t even remember how I learned of it, but yes, I went downtown to pull the original building permit. I called Sue Hunter Weir and asked her if she had heard of the name “Pauline Fjelde.” Sue’s response was “If it is one of the Fjelde sisters who sewed the flag, you’ve struck gold!” I then went to the HHM. They knew immediately who she was. The discovery aspect of everything was so exciting. What is sad is that had the house survived just a few short years, market recovery would have taken care of it and put it back to use. Multi unit dwellings are hard to come by right now and fetching very good sale prices. But of course . . . it did not.

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